ABQ To Do Visit Albuquerque Visitors Guide

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CALENDAR

Oct
17
Thu
Los Alamos Farmers Market @ Mesa Public Library parking lot
Oct 17 @ 7:00 am – 12:30 pm


The Los Alamos Farmers’ Market, a Los Alamos institution for decades welcomes you to enjoy and take part in our market. Our outdoor market operates on Thursday mornings weekly from May through October each year. On peak days we feature more than forty vendors of fruits, vegetables, meats, cheeses, pestos, jams, breads, and much more. Average vendor participation in 2009 was 33 vendors. 2009 estimated sales were $485,000 of which more than $400K was by farmer/rancher vendors. On busy days, more than 2000 patrons frequent the market.

Our monthly winter markets are also popular community events.

We are always on the look-out for new and interesting vendors. Contact the market manager for more information.

The Los Alamos Farmers’ Market is a project of Los Alamos MainStreet.

Produce
Organics
Vegetables
Fruits
Flowers
Meats
Cheeses
Breads
… much more

The Los Alamos Farmer’s Market is the place to be on Thursday mornings May through October from 7:00 AM until 12:30 PM in the Mesa Public Library Parking lot in downtown Los Alamos. For more information, contact Market Manager Cindy Talamantes. Email or 505-581-4651 H 505-929-6579
… and fun!

Oct
19
Sat
High Desert Fine Art Festival @ Farmington Civic Center
Oct 19 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

The High Desert Fine Art Festival is open to the public and features 20 to 30 of the best artists of the Four Corners area working in various categories and mediums. The show is an indoor event at the Farmington Civic Center in Farmington, New Mexico.

Come meet the artists and have the opportunity to purchase fine, quality art directly from the artist at very reasonable prices. This event is sponsored by the Northwest New Mexico Arts Council. For information call 505-716-6057.

Oct
24
Thu
Los Alamos Farmers Market @ Mesa Public Library parking lot
Oct 24 @ 7:00 am – 12:30 pm


The Los Alamos Farmers’ Market, a Los Alamos institution for decades welcomes you to enjoy and take part in our market. Our outdoor market operates on Thursday mornings weekly from May through October each year. On peak days we feature more than forty vendors of fruits, vegetables, meats, cheeses, pestos, jams, breads, and much more. Average vendor participation in 2009 was 33 vendors. 2009 estimated sales were $485,000 of which more than $400K was by farmer/rancher vendors. On busy days, more than 2000 patrons frequent the market.

Our monthly winter markets are also popular community events.

We are always on the look-out for new and interesting vendors. Contact the market manager for more information.

The Los Alamos Farmers’ Market is a project of Los Alamos MainStreet.

Produce
Organics
Vegetables
Fruits
Flowers
Meats
Cheeses
Breads
… much more

The Los Alamos Farmer’s Market is the place to be on Thursday mornings May through October from 7:00 AM until 12:30 PM in the Mesa Public Library Parking lot in downtown Los Alamos. For more information, contact Market Manager Cindy Talamantes. Email or 505-581-4651 H 505-929-6579
… and fun!

Oct
31
Thu
Los Alamos Farmers Market @ Mesa Public Library parking lot
Oct 31 @ 7:00 am – 12:30 pm


The Los Alamos Farmers’ Market, a Los Alamos institution for decades welcomes you to enjoy and take part in our market. Our outdoor market operates on Thursday mornings weekly from May through October each year. On peak days we feature more than forty vendors of fruits, vegetables, meats, cheeses, pestos, jams, breads, and much more. Average vendor participation in 2009 was 33 vendors. 2009 estimated sales were $485,000 of which more than $400K was by farmer/rancher vendors. On busy days, more than 2000 patrons frequent the market.

Our monthly winter markets are also popular community events.

We are always on the look-out for new and interesting vendors. Contact the market manager for more information.

The Los Alamos Farmers’ Market is a project of Los Alamos MainStreet.

Produce
Organics
Vegetables
Fruits
Flowers
Meats
Cheeses
Breads
… much more

The Los Alamos Farmer’s Market is the place to be on Thursday mornings May through October from 7:00 AM until 12:30 PM in the Mesa Public Library Parking lot in downtown Los Alamos. For more information, contact Market Manager Cindy Talamantes. Email or 505-581-4651 H 505-929-6579
… and fun!

Nov
2
Sat
New Mexico Senior Olympics State Summer Games
Nov 2 – Nov 4 all-day

New Mexico Senior Olympics is dedicated to provide adults 50+ with opportunities for a healthy active lifestyle. Our mission is to promote physical fitness for seniors statewide: provide year-round opportunities and motivation for adults 50+ to participate in local, state and national games. During the year of 2019,  we will host Health Promotion Events, EnhanceFitness Groups, Indian Game Day (IGD), and Team Tournaments.

New Mexico Senior Olympics Summer Games features over 90 events in 23+ different sports. There are 130+ communities and 22 Local Game Sites across the state encouraging a healthy lifestyle in mature adults 50+ and we encourage our State Senior Olympians to compete with their respected local Senior Games, but all sports/events are open to out-of-state athletes and do not require you to qualify thru locals. New Mexico Senior Olympics also offers State Team Tournaments in Basketball 3 on 3, Softball, and Volleyball, which are also open to out-of-state teams/athletes and do not require you to qualify thru locals. This is the year for the 2019 National Senior Games presented by Humana, happening in Albuquerque, NM.

How to get started: At the State Level, Team Tournament registration is open (Basketball 3-on-3, Volleyball, and Softball) click here for more info. Summer Games registration is currently closed.

Scandinavian Festival @ Immanuel Presbyterian Church
Nov 2 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

SCANDINAVIAN FESTIVAL

A Scandinavian Festival will be held at Immanuel Presbyterian Church, 114 Carlisle SE, Albuquerque, NM on Saturday, November 2, 2019 from 10am-4pm featuring food, Norwegian and Swedish folk art, Scandinavian dance performances (11am & 12:30pm), and kids’ craft corner.  Admission and parking are free.  https://www.facebook.com/NMRosemalers/ or https://www.facebook.com/scandiabq/

Nov
3
Sun
New Mexico Senior Olympics State Summer Games
Nov 3 – Nov 5 all-day

New Mexico Senior Olympics is dedicated to provide adults 50+ with opportunities for a healthy active lifestyle. Our mission is to promote physical fitness for seniors statewide: provide year-round opportunities and motivation for adults 50+ to participate in local, state and national games. During the year of 2019,  we will host Health Promotion Events, EnhanceFitness Groups, Indian Game Day (IGD), and Team Tournaments.

New Mexico Senior Olympics Summer Games features over 90 events in 23+ different sports. There are 130+ communities and 22 Local Game Sites across the state encouraging a healthy lifestyle in mature adults 50+ and we encourage our State Senior Olympians to compete with their respected local Senior Games, but all sports/events are open to out-of-state athletes and do not require you to qualify thru locals. New Mexico Senior Olympics also offers State Team Tournaments in Basketball 3 on 3, Softball, and Volleyball, which are also open to out-of-state teams/athletes and do not require you to qualify thru locals. This is the year for the 2019 National Senior Games presented by Humana, happening in Albuquerque, NM.

How to get started: At the State Level, Team Tournament registration is open (Basketball 3-on-3, Volleyball, and Softball) click here for more info. Summer Games registration is currently closed.

Nov
8
Fri
Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction @ Crownpoint Elementary School
Nov 8 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Ya’at’eeh (Welcome)

The Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction
Crownpoint, New Mexico

Weavers waiting for auction to begin. Photo by Anne Galer

Founded over 50 years ago by Crownpoint Trading Post owners, the late Lavonne and Bill Palmer, the Crownpoint Rug Auction is a genuine Navajo event featuring contemporary, handmade, all-wool Navajo rugs and the weavers who make them. In 2014 the Navajo Rug Weavers’ Association of Crownpoint took over management of the auction and turned it into a prime venue for buyers and weavers of genuine Navajo rugs.

The auction takes place once a month (usually the second Friday) at the Crownpoint Elementary School. Weavers from all over the Navajo Nation bring in their rugs starting at 4:00 pm and the rugs are laid out on tables for buyers to inspect. Rug submission/inspection ends at 6:30 pm and the auction starts at 7:00 pm. It can run until 10:00 pm or later if there are many rugs to be sold. Rugs sell from less than $50 to thousands of dollars.

AUCTION DATES 2019

January 11, 2019
February 8, 2019
March 8, 2019
April 12, 2019
May 10, 2019
June 14, 2019
July 12, 2019
August 9, 2019
September 13, 2019
October 11, 2019
November 8, 2019
December 13, 2019

Buyers can pay for rugs with cash, credit cards or by check.
Weavers receive checks issued by the Navajo Weavers’ Association for their sold rugs the night of the auction.

Auction Bidding Wayne Connell & Delbert Autry Auctioneers. Photo by Anne Galer

Food is available from the school cafeteria featuring Navajo tacos and other local specialties.

In addition to the rug auction, vendors selling quality Navajo jewelry, art and crafts set up in the school gym. Vendor space fees are 4 by 3 foot $15.00, 5 by 3 foot $20.00. You provide your own tables and chairs.

Directions: Crownpoint is located about 30 minutes north of I-40 (Thoreau exit #53) on state highway 371. Turn west at the sign for Crownpoint. The Elementary School is located about a mile towards town, just past the Post Office on the north side of the road.

For More Information:
Our email is newcrownpointrugauction@gmail.com.
Address: PO Box 454, Crownpoint, NM 87313
The Crownpoint Chapter Office phone is (505) 786-2130/2131
Or call Marcella Hale 505 362-8502.
Email: mmhale@hotmail.com

Rug Viewing. Photo by Anne Galer

Where to stay: There is no lodging in Crownpoint and the new Elementary School parking lot is usually locked after the auction.
Motel accommodations are available just off of I-40 in Gallup (50 miles west of Thoreau) and Grants (30 miles east of Thoreau).
Camping is available at Bluewater Lake State Park (Prewitt exit off I-40), Redrocks State Park (Gallup) or in private campgrounds/RV parks in Grants, Gallup, and Farmington.

Dec
13
Fri
Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction @ Crownpoint Elementary School
Dec 13 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Ya’at’eeh (Welcome)

The Crownpoint Navajo Rug Auction
Crownpoint, New Mexico

Weavers waiting for auction to begin. Photo by Anne Galer

Founded over 50 years ago by Crownpoint Trading Post owners, the late Lavonne and Bill Palmer, the Crownpoint Rug Auction is a genuine Navajo event featuring contemporary, handmade, all-wool Navajo rugs and the weavers who make them. In 2014 the Navajo Rug Weavers’ Association of Crownpoint took over management of the auction and turned it into a prime venue for buyers and weavers of genuine Navajo rugs.

The auction takes place once a month (usually the second Friday) at the Crownpoint Elementary School. Weavers from all over the Navajo Nation bring in their rugs starting at 4:00 pm and the rugs are laid out on tables for buyers to inspect. Rug submission/inspection ends at 6:30 pm and the auction starts at 7:00 pm. It can run until 10:00 pm or later if there are many rugs to be sold. Rugs sell from less than $50 to thousands of dollars.

AUCTION DATES 2019

January 11, 2019
February 8, 2019
March 8, 2019
April 12, 2019
May 10, 2019
June 14, 2019
July 12, 2019
August 9, 2019
September 13, 2019
October 11, 2019
November 8, 2019
December 13, 2019

Buyers can pay for rugs with cash, credit cards or by check.
Weavers receive checks issued by the Navajo Weavers’ Association for their sold rugs the night of the auction.

Auction Bidding Wayne Connell & Delbert Autry Auctioneers. Photo by Anne Galer

Food is available from the school cafeteria featuring Navajo tacos and other local specialties.

In addition to the rug auction, vendors selling quality Navajo jewelry, art and crafts set up in the school gym. Vendor space fees are 4 by 3 foot $15.00, 5 by 3 foot $20.00. You provide your own tables and chairs.

Directions: Crownpoint is located about 30 minutes north of I-40 (Thoreau exit #53) on state highway 371. Turn west at the sign for Crownpoint. The Elementary School is located about a mile towards town, just past the Post Office on the north side of the road.

For More Information:
Our email is newcrownpointrugauction@gmail.com.
Address: PO Box 454, Crownpoint, NM 87313
The Crownpoint Chapter Office phone is (505) 786-2130/2131
Or call Marcella Hale 505 362-8502.
Email: mmhale@hotmail.com

Rug Viewing. Photo by Anne Galer

Where to stay: There is no lodging in Crownpoint and the new Elementary School parking lot is usually locked after the auction.
Motel accommodations are available just off of I-40 in Gallup (50 miles west of Thoreau) and Grants (30 miles east of Thoreau).
Camping is available at Bluewater Lake State Park (Prewitt exit off I-40), Redrocks State Park (Gallup) or in private campgrounds/RV parks in Grants, Gallup, and Farmington.

Sep
4
Fri
Isleta Pueblo Feast Day – St. Augustinito
Sep 4 all-day

Isleta means “Little Island” in Spanish, but Isleta Pueblo is hardly “little” having and area of 211,002 acres and a population greater than three thousand.

Isleta has had a troubled history. When the Pueblo Revolt began, many of the members fled to Hopi settlements in Arizona, while a number of Isleta people accompanied the Spanish in their retreat to El Paso del Norte. After the rebellion was brought under control, the Isleta people returned to their former home, some bringing Hopi mates and half-Hopi Children.

When some members of the Laguna Pueblo and the Acoma Pueblo joined the Isleta community in the eighteen hundreds, friction within this heterogeneous society led to internal disagreement over religious and ritual matters.

The solution to this conflict resulted in the creation of the satellite settlement of Oraibi. The Pueblo today is comprised of two small communities. Oraibi and Chicale and the the main Pueblo, Isleta.

The language is generally Tiwa with most people speaking English as well. Agriculture is the principal occupation of the Isleta people. Additional revenue is derived from land leased to local business concerns and to the United States Government.

A high portion of the population works outside the reservation, but a recent revival of pottery making is giving work to a number of artisans.

The Chiwiwi family, which is noted for its high quality work, has created fine products in the traditional style of pottery which are gaining the attention of collectors. Embroidery and jewelry-making are also experiencing a revival.

Isleta is also known for excellent bread baking.

The Isleta Pueblo performs several dances open to the public during June, July and August as well as September Fair and Christmas festivals.

Camping and fishing at Sunrise Lake on the Isleta Reservation are popular vacation attractions.

Sep
8
Tue
Pueblo of Laguna – Encinal Village Feast -Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary’s Feast Day
Sep 8 all-day

Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary’s Feast Day. Harvest and social dances at Village of Encinal, Laguna Pueblo

Laguna is surrounded by enchanting mesas and is situated at the foothills of the beautiful mountains of Mount Taylor.  Laguna is located 45 miles west of Albuquerque on Interstate 40. The reservation consists of approximately 500,000 acres of land situated in Cibola, Valencia, Bernalillo and Sandoval counties.  The residents of Laguna Pueblo live in six villages which are Laguna, Mesita, Paguate, Seama, Paraje, and Encinal.  The Tribal administration building is located in the village of Laguna. You can experience the uniqueness of our Pueblo by visiting in person.

Sep
14
Mon
Go-Jii-Yah Feast
Sep 14 all-day

Go-Jii-Yah Feast, annual celebration with foot races, powwow and country rodeo – Jicarilla Apache

“Feast Days” at each of the Pueblos are named after the Pueblos’ patron saint.  The Pueblos open up their respective Feast Days to the public (see calendar and etiquette pages) where visitors can view the reverent dances and songs offered on those days.  Feast Days bring tribal members together to renew their culture, language and native religion.  On those days, families prepare food for the many invited visitors coming through their homes, and participate in the activities taking place on their Feast Day. Pueblo Feast Day Dates do not change and are held on the same date each year.

Located by Stone Lake 19 miles (31 kilometers) south of Dulce. Annual celebration includes foot races, pow wow, country rodeo.

Jicarilla Apache Reservation

Sep
4
Sat
Isleta Pueblo Feast Day – St. Augustinito
Sep 4 all-day

Isleta means “Little Island” in Spanish, but Isleta Pueblo is hardly “little” having and area of 211,002 acres and a population greater than three thousand.

Isleta has had a troubled history. When the Pueblo Revolt began, many of the members fled to Hopi settlements in Arizona, while a number of Isleta people accompanied the Spanish in their retreat to El Paso del Norte. After the rebellion was brought under control, the Isleta people returned to their former home, some bringing Hopi mates and half-Hopi Children.

When some members of the Laguna Pueblo and the Acoma Pueblo joined the Isleta community in the eighteen hundreds, friction within this heterogeneous society led to internal disagreement over religious and ritual matters.

The solution to this conflict resulted in the creation of the satellite settlement of Oraibi. The Pueblo today is comprised of two small communities. Oraibi and Chicale and the the main Pueblo, Isleta.

The language is generally Tiwa with most people speaking English as well. Agriculture is the principal occupation of the Isleta people. Additional revenue is derived from land leased to local business concerns and to the United States Government.

A high portion of the population works outside the reservation, but a recent revival of pottery making is giving work to a number of artisans.

The Chiwiwi family, which is noted for its high quality work, has created fine products in the traditional style of pottery which are gaining the attention of collectors. Embroidery and jewelry-making are also experiencing a revival.

Isleta is also known for excellent bread baking.

The Isleta Pueblo performs several dances open to the public during June, July and August as well as September Fair and Christmas festivals.

Camping and fishing at Sunrise Lake on the Isleta Reservation are popular vacation attractions.

Sep
8
Wed
Pueblo of Laguna – Encinal Village Feast -Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary’s Feast Day
Sep 8 all-day

Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary’s Feast Day. Harvest and social dances at Village of Encinal, Laguna Pueblo

Laguna is surrounded by enchanting mesas and is situated at the foothills of the beautiful mountains of Mount Taylor.  Laguna is located 45 miles west of Albuquerque on Interstate 40. The reservation consists of approximately 500,000 acres of land situated in Cibola, Valencia, Bernalillo and Sandoval counties.  The residents of Laguna Pueblo live in six villages which are Laguna, Mesita, Paguate, Seama, Paraje, and Encinal.  The Tribal administration building is located in the village of Laguna. You can experience the uniqueness of our Pueblo by visiting in person.

Sep
14
Tue
Go-Jii-Yah Feast
Sep 14 all-day

Go-Jii-Yah Feast, annual celebration with foot races, powwow and country rodeo – Jicarilla Apache

“Feast Days” at each of the Pueblos are named after the Pueblos’ patron saint.  The Pueblos open up their respective Feast Days to the public (see calendar and etiquette pages) where visitors can view the reverent dances and songs offered on those days.  Feast Days bring tribal members together to renew their culture, language and native religion.  On those days, families prepare food for the many invited visitors coming through their homes, and participate in the activities taking place on their Feast Day. Pueblo Feast Day Dates do not change and are held on the same date each year.

Located by Stone Lake 19 miles (31 kilometers) south of Dulce. Annual celebration includes foot races, pow wow, country rodeo.

Jicarilla Apache Reservation

Sep
4
Sun
Isleta Pueblo Feast Day – St. Augustinito
Sep 4 all-day

Isleta means “Little Island” in Spanish, but Isleta Pueblo is hardly “little” having and area of 211,002 acres and a population greater than three thousand.

Isleta has had a troubled history. When the Pueblo Revolt began, many of the members fled to Hopi settlements in Arizona, while a number of Isleta people accompanied the Spanish in their retreat to El Paso del Norte. After the rebellion was brought under control, the Isleta people returned to their former home, some bringing Hopi mates and half-Hopi Children.

When some members of the Laguna Pueblo and the Acoma Pueblo joined the Isleta community in the eighteen hundreds, friction within this heterogeneous society led to internal disagreement over religious and ritual matters.

The solution to this conflict resulted in the creation of the satellite settlement of Oraibi. The Pueblo today is comprised of two small communities. Oraibi and Chicale and the the main Pueblo, Isleta.

The language is generally Tiwa with most people speaking English as well. Agriculture is the principal occupation of the Isleta people. Additional revenue is derived from land leased to local business concerns and to the United States Government.

A high portion of the population works outside the reservation, but a recent revival of pottery making is giving work to a number of artisans.

The Chiwiwi family, which is noted for its high quality work, has created fine products in the traditional style of pottery which are gaining the attention of collectors. Embroidery and jewelry-making are also experiencing a revival.

Isleta is also known for excellent bread baking.

The Isleta Pueblo performs several dances open to the public during June, July and August as well as September Fair and Christmas festivals.

Camping and fishing at Sunrise Lake on the Isleta Reservation are popular vacation attractions.

Sep
8
Thu
Pueblo of Laguna – Encinal Village Feast -Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary’s Feast Day
Sep 8 all-day

Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary’s Feast Day. Harvest and social dances at Village of Encinal, Laguna Pueblo

Laguna is surrounded by enchanting mesas and is situated at the foothills of the beautiful mountains of Mount Taylor.  Laguna is located 45 miles west of Albuquerque on Interstate 40. The reservation consists of approximately 500,000 acres of land situated in Cibola, Valencia, Bernalillo and Sandoval counties.  The residents of Laguna Pueblo live in six villages which are Laguna, Mesita, Paguate, Seama, Paraje, and Encinal.  The Tribal administration building is located in the village of Laguna. You can experience the uniqueness of our Pueblo by visiting in person.

Sep
14
Wed
Go-Jii-Yah Feast
Sep 14 all-day

Go-Jii-Yah Feast, annual celebration with foot races, powwow and country rodeo – Jicarilla Apache

“Feast Days” at each of the Pueblos are named after the Pueblos’ patron saint.  The Pueblos open up their respective Feast Days to the public (see calendar and etiquette pages) where visitors can view the reverent dances and songs offered on those days.  Feast Days bring tribal members together to renew their culture, language and native religion.  On those days, families prepare food for the many invited visitors coming through their homes, and participate in the activities taking place on their Feast Day. Pueblo Feast Day Dates do not change and are held on the same date each year.

Located by Stone Lake 19 miles (31 kilometers) south of Dulce. Annual celebration includes foot races, pow wow, country rodeo.

Jicarilla Apache Reservation

Sep
4
Mon
Isleta Pueblo Feast Day – St. Augustinito
Sep 4 all-day

Isleta means “Little Island” in Spanish, but Isleta Pueblo is hardly “little” having and area of 211,002 acres and a population greater than three thousand.

Isleta has had a troubled history. When the Pueblo Revolt began, many of the members fled to Hopi settlements in Arizona, while a number of Isleta people accompanied the Spanish in their retreat to El Paso del Norte. After the rebellion was brought under control, the Isleta people returned to their former home, some bringing Hopi mates and half-Hopi Children.

When some members of the Laguna Pueblo and the Acoma Pueblo joined the Isleta community in the eighteen hundreds, friction within this heterogeneous society led to internal disagreement over religious and ritual matters.

The solution to this conflict resulted in the creation of the satellite settlement of Oraibi. The Pueblo today is comprised of two small communities. Oraibi and Chicale and the the main Pueblo, Isleta.

The language is generally Tiwa with most people speaking English as well. Agriculture is the principal occupation of the Isleta people. Additional revenue is derived from land leased to local business concerns and to the United States Government.

A high portion of the population works outside the reservation, but a recent revival of pottery making is giving work to a number of artisans.

The Chiwiwi family, which is noted for its high quality work, has created fine products in the traditional style of pottery which are gaining the attention of collectors. Embroidery and jewelry-making are also experiencing a revival.

Isleta is also known for excellent bread baking.

The Isleta Pueblo performs several dances open to the public during June, July and August as well as September Fair and Christmas festivals.

Camping and fishing at Sunrise Lake on the Isleta Reservation are popular vacation attractions.

Sep
8
Fri
Pueblo of Laguna – Encinal Village Feast -Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary’s Feast Day
Sep 8 all-day

Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary’s Feast Day. Harvest and social dances at Village of Encinal, Laguna Pueblo

Laguna is surrounded by enchanting mesas and is situated at the foothills of the beautiful mountains of Mount Taylor.  Laguna is located 45 miles west of Albuquerque on Interstate 40. The reservation consists of approximately 500,000 acres of land situated in Cibola, Valencia, Bernalillo and Sandoval counties.  The residents of Laguna Pueblo live in six villages which are Laguna, Mesita, Paguate, Seama, Paraje, and Encinal.  The Tribal administration building is located in the village of Laguna. You can experience the uniqueness of our Pueblo by visiting in person.